10 Causes of Hair Loss

Losing hair can be an annoying, embarrassing, and frustrating experience. While hair loss can happen at any age, those in their late 20s and 30s usually notice hair loss the most. There are also notable differences in hair loss in men and women. Men tend to notice hair loss and bald spots on the top of the head first, and women notice hair loss and bald spots at the very front of the head.

Hair loss and balding are normal parts of aging, which is a major reason hair restoration surgery has become so prevalent. There are plenty of ways to prevent hair loss, and many people never experience it until they’re in their 50s or 60s. But many scalp conditions can cause hair loss. Some are linked to hormonal changes, while others are related to other medical issues. Let’s look at the 10 most common causes of hair loss.

Age

Hair loss is a common problem. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, more than 50 percent of men and 30 percent of women will suffer from hair loss by the time they reach the age of 35. As you get older, it’s common to lose hair.

Genetics

Some hair loss can be genetic. If a parent or grandparent had bald spots, it’s more likely you’ll suffer from the same condition or condition. Genetics can be a major factor when it comes to hair loss. Well, according to recent research, genetics is responsible for about 95% of every hair-related condition, including cutting hair, damaged hair follicles, thinning hair, and hair loss.

Hormonal Changes

There are some differences between male and female hormones. Estrogen influences hair growth in women, whereas testosterone is primarily responsible for hair growth in men. When a woman goes through menopause, her estrogen levels drop, which results in thinning hair. Men, on the other hand, typically experience thinning hair when they are no longer producing enough testosterone.

A Stressful Life Event

It is the number one enemy of beautiful and healthy-looking hair. Not only will a hectic or stressful lifestyle cause hair loss, but stress can actually prevent new hair from growing by speeding up your resting metabolic rate. Even short-term stress can affect your hairline.

Nutritional Deficiencies

It’s common to lose hair as you age, but hair loss can be caused when your body is not getting the nutrients it needs. Certain deficiencies can lead to thinning hair and can even lead to hair loss. Many nutritional deficiencies can cause hair loss, including zinc, iron, vitamins A and D, protein, and vitamin A.

Autoimmune Disease

An autoimmune disease is a disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks its own cells. This type of hair loss is most commonly caused by an autoimmune condition called alopecia areata, in which the immune system attacks hair follicles. Women are more prone to the condition than men, which often begins on the scalp.

Infections

Fungal infections, scalp and hair diseases, and even stress can cause hair to fall out. Infectious diseases are one of the most common causes of 100 percent loss of hair, and this can happen at any age.

Medications

When it comes to hair, thicker is definitely better. What you find in your head is a reflection of your overall health and your diet, so it should be no surprise that hair loss is closely linked to diet and medication use. Unfortunately, hair loss can be associated with various things, including:

  • Anemia
  • Birth Control Pills
  • Chemotherapy
  • Social Stress
  • Overuse Of Hair Dye
  • Radiation Treatments
  • Stress
  • Thyroid Disease
  • Vitamins

Traumatic Hair Styling and Inflammation

Traumatic hair styling and inflammation are leading causes of hair loss. Hair falls out as a result of these causes. Hair loss generally starts as a thinning of the hair. It may be temporary or permanent. Treatment of hair loss depends on the cause of hair loss.

Chemotherapy and Radiation

Chemotherapy and radiation are two common treatments used to treat cancer. Both cause hair loss, but chemotherapy is much more likely to cause hair loss in most cases. The hair loss caused by chemotherapy can be temporary or permanent, depending on the person’s particular situation.